Tapestry weaves a beautiful fabric of sound whenever they sing. —Intelligencer Journal

Explore the depths and heights of idealized love, in this program featuring the stunningly beautiful poetry and music of Guillaume de Machaut and Guillaume Du Fay. This is the era of French courtly love, amour courtois, that author Francis X. Neuman describes so well. "In essence, courtly love was an experience between erotic desire and spiritual attainment that now seems contradictory as a love illicit yet morally elevating, passionate yet disciplined, humiliating yet exalting, human yet transcendent."

Guillaume de Machaut is reputed to be the most important figure and finest composer of the French Ars Nova in the 14th century.

A full generation later Guillaume Du Fay, born in Cambrai France, is one of the most important and prolific composers of the 15th-century Renaissance period. He, along with his colleague Gilles Binchois, is credited with bringing the "English countenance" to continental Europe; a style that moves away from the Medieval harmonic structures of Machaut through the use of triadic harmonies. The ensemble explores the intersection of these two very different soundscapes through a common form: the canon. The canon first gained currency through the works of these master composers who laid the groundwork for Pachabel's famous Canon in D and other well known works in this contrapuntal style.

To close the concert, Tapestry takes the listener to a French Court on the island of Cyprus with an exquisite 4-part canon, Toujour.


Performers

The program features singers of Tapestry with vielle, medieval and renaissance harps, flute and douçaine.


Program

Le lay de la fonteinne Guillaume de Machaut 1300–1377
Dame a vous  
Ma fin est mon commencement  
Adieu m'amour  
Sanz cuer m'en vois  
Par doit je puis bien Guillaume Du Fay 1397–1474
Je me complains  
Ma belle dame souveraine  
Les douleur  
Vasillisa ergo gaude  
Contra douleur Anon. 14th c, Cyprus
Toujour and more…  

Program duration

approximately 90' with intermission suitable for a resonant medium-sized church or concert hall